Migration Research Cluster

Housing Boom and Impact on Labor Market Outcomes

This paper by Yaxi Chen approaches the impact of China's booming housing market in the past 15 years, with a focus on the impact of the capital crowding out effect on other productive sector, and possible labor reallocation across different sectors.
  • 2203 SS&H (Andrews Conference Room) | UC Davis
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Governing Ethnicized and Economized 'Migrant Subjects': 'Migrant Entrepreneurs' from Turkey in Vienna

Alev Çakır will give an overview of her doctoral work that analyzes the governing of 'migrant entrepreneurship', taking the example of türkiyeli (coming from Turkey) entrepreneurs, in Austria by both, policies and 'migrant entrepreneurs' themselves. She investigates issues on neoliberal economization and ethnicization of the 'migrant subject' by discussing the role of intersectional power relations and the political embeddedness of these processes.
  • 1131 SS&H Gold Conference Room | UC Davis
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"The Short-Run Impacts of Immigration on Native Workers: A Sectoral Approach"

This paper by Zach Rutledge provides empirical estimates of the short-run impacts of immigration on the employment opportunities of US-born workers based on a novel sectoral approach. It will focus on six economic sectors with low skill requirements and high shares of immigrant workers based on panel data at the metropolitan area-year level of aggregation.
  • 2203 SS&H (Andrews Conference Room) | UC Davis
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Farm Labor 2019: Other Countries, California, Immigration

This conference examines labor-related issues in California and US agriculture. Labor-intensive fruit and vegetable crops are almost 85 percent of California and 40 percent of US crop sales, farm worker employment has been increasing, and the state’s mostly unauthorized farm workers are aging and settling in one place with families that include US-born children.
  • Kalmanovitz Appellate Courtroom, UC Davis Law School
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NAWS at 30

The National Agricultural Worker Survey (NAWS) began to interview workers employed on crop farms in calendar year 1988, and has interviewed over 70,000 workers in the past three decades. This conference examines NAWS and other farm labor data. Presenters are asked to consider (1) whether the NAWS methodology of multi-stage sampling to account for seasonal and regional fluctuations in farm employment or other aspects of the survey’s design need to be modified, and (2) whether the NAWS questionnaire should be modified to collect better or additional data.
  • 2203 SS&H (Andrews Conference Room) | UC Davis
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Anglicized Names and Support for Minority Candidates

Immigrants to America have long had a history of anglicizing Jewish, Polish and Russian names for the sake of fitting in. More recently, research on labor market discrimination show prospective employers do not necessarily discriminate against resumes with Asian names, but they are more likely to call back resumes with Anglicized Asian names rather than non-Anglicized ones. Fan Lu designs a conjoint experiment that tests whether White voters exhibit a similar preference for what she calls "ethnic-lite" political candidates.
  • 2203 SS&H (Andrews Conference Room) | UC Davis
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Debunking Deportation Myths

As US policymakers struggle to find a policy solution to address the restrictions on legal immigration that lead to undocumented immigration, deportations have become a reality affecting lives of millions of immigrants and local communities.
  • Student Community Center
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Between the Ottomans and the Entente: The First World War in the Syrian and Lebanese Diaspora, 1908-1925

In this talk, Assistant Professor Stacy Fahrenthold examines the politics of Syrian and Lebanese migration during the First World War. Examining how empires at war—from the Ottomans to the French—claimed emigrants abroad as part of the state-building process, Fahrenthold argues they transformed this diaspora into an epicenter for Arab nationalist politics.
  • 2203 SS&H (Andrews Conference Room) | UC Davis
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Practices of Place-making in Displacement: Memory and Livelihoods of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) in Georgia

In this project, Professor Joanna Regulska argues that IDPs use memory, acts of ‘re-membering’, in order to attain and maintain a state of mobility. She explores the relationship between memory and place-making (a practice of building ties with a place). She focuses on the agency of displaced persons as they act to overcome the experience of dis-placement and retain or regain the symbolic ties to home and homeland through their memories.
  • 2203 SS&H (Andrews Conference Room) | UC Davis
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