Migration Research Cluster

"Get Out: How Authoritarian Governments Decide Who Emigrates"

Even the most authoritarian governments allow some citizens to leave. How do they decide who can leave? In this paper, Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at UCLA Margaret Peters argues that authoritarian leaders face trade-offs when deciding which individuals should be allowed to leave.

The Economic and Political Impacts of Displacement from Hurricane Maria

Faced with a long and uncertain recovery, many Puerto Ricans instead opted to move to the US mainland, where as US citizens they enjoy full rights to work and vote. Using various data sources, including data from FEMA disaster relief applications, Justin Wiltshire shows that rather than spreading uniformly throughout the contiguous states these evacuees tended to cluster heavily in relatively few areas.
  • 2203 SS&H (Andrews Conference Room) | UC Davis
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The Impact of Refugees on Native Students’ Academic Achievement and Post-secondary Education

In this paper, Cynthia van der Werf studies how the largest inflow of refugees in U.S. history –Indochinese refugees at the end of the Vietnam War – affected U.S. children by examining whether native children’s academic achievement was lower in ZIP Codes with higher shares of refugees using the National Education Longitudinal Study (NELS88), the National Assessment of Educational Progress, and U.S. Census data.
  • 2203 SS&H (Andrews Conference Room) | UC Davis
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2019 Economics Alumni Conference

This third annual conference will discuss alumni research as well as provide opportunities to network and create collaborative relationships with current and future UC Davis Ph.D students.
  • Andrews, Blue, and Gold Conference Rooms, SSH
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Housing Boom and Impact on Labor Market Outcomes

This paper by Yaxi Chen approaches the impact of China's booming housing market in the past 15 years, with a focus on the impact of the capital crowding out effect on other productive sector, and possible labor reallocation across different sectors.
  • 2203 SS&H (Andrews Conference Room) | UC Davis
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Governing Ethnicized and Economized 'Migrant Subjects': 'Migrant Entrepreneurs' from Turkey in Vienna

Alev Çakır will give an overview of her doctoral work that analyzes the governing of 'migrant entrepreneurship', taking the example of türkiyeli (coming from Turkey) entrepreneurs, in Austria by both, policies and 'migrant entrepreneurs' themselves. She investigates issues on neoliberal economization and ethnicization of the 'migrant subject' by discussing the role of intersectional power relations and the political embeddedness of these processes.
  • 1131 SS&H Gold Conference Room | UC Davis
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"The Short-Run Impacts of Immigration on Native Workers: A Sectoral Approach"

This paper by Zach Rutledge provides empirical estimates of the short-run impacts of immigration on the employment opportunities of US-born workers based on a novel sectoral approach. It will focus on six economic sectors with low skill requirements and high shares of immigrant workers based on panel data at the metropolitan area-year level of aggregation.
  • 2203 SS&H (Andrews Conference Room) | UC Davis
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